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News - July 24 PDF Print E-mail
Written by Shawn Loughlin   
Wednesday, 23 July 2014 14:58
For anyone who has been to the Belgrave, Blyth and Brussels Elementary School Fair before, now simply the Elementary School Fair, you’ll recognize this site: a class preparing to march in the fair’s annual parade. The only difference was that on Sunday, this class hadn’t been in
For anyone who has been to the Belgrave, Blyth and Brussels Elementary School Fair before, now simply the Elementary School Fair, you’ll recognize this site: a class preparing to march in the fair’s annual parade. The only difference was that on Sunday, this class hadn’t been in session for quite sometime. Blyth Lions Park was the site of the S.S. #10 reunion and dozens of former students and local historians were in attendance to take a stroll (and march) down Memory Lane. Eleanor Babcock, right, led the former students around the pavilion. (Emily Manns photo)
Last Updated on Thursday, 24 July 2014 12:12
 
Dinning Honoured With Memorial Bridge - July 24 PDF Print E-mail
Written by Shawn Loughlin   
Wednesday, 23 July 2014 14:54
At the Wingham Legion on Friday, fallen Corporal Matthew Dinning of Wingham was honoured as a bridge along the Bluewater Veteran’s Highway (Highway 21) was dedicated in his name.
The bridge, which spans Clark Creek in Bruce County, will now be bookended by signs bearing Dinning’s name and the Military Police crest, one at each end of the bridge.
In an interview with CKNX, Matthew’s father Lincoln said the location of the sign, in Bruce County, is one he’s happy with.
“You actually see the Bluewater Veteran’s Highway sign with the poppy and the very next thing you see will be Corporal Matthew Dinning Memorial Bridge, so it is an excellent location,” Dinning said. “We used to drive to Kincardine with the boys for hockey and for swimming and it was great; so, good choice.”
Dinning, a Canadian Armed Forces Military Police member, was killed in the line of duty during a tour of Afghanistan in April, 2006. The incident occurred when the armoured G-Wagon Dinning was travelling in struck a roadside IED (improvised explosive device). Three other soldiers travelling in the vehicle were also killed.
Major Greg Losier, Dinning’s commanding officer at the time, was in Wingham for the unveiling. He told CKNX that Dinning was a true soldier who did everything he did for the miliary.
“For the military, a bridge is something that you cross, an obstacle that allows you to move forward. But a bridge is also, according to Webster’s Dictionary, is a time, place or means of connection. And it’s an apropos memorial for someone who made the ultimate sacrifice, and it’s an absolute privilege we can recognize Matthew,” Losier said.
In a statement released on Friday, Rob Nicholson, Niagara Falls MP and Minister of National Defence, said the program to honour fallen veterans with highway memorials is an important one.
“It is always important to honour the sacrifice of our Canadian Armed Forces and their families. It is with great pride that our government recognizes the strength of those who serve our country, and thanks them for their dedication. It is a fitting commemoration of the sacrifice made by Corporal Dinning to be included as part of the Highway Memorials for Fallen Police Officers,” Nicholson said.
Colonel Robert Delaney, Canadian Forces Provost Marshal and Commander Canadian Forces Military Police Group, also said it was important to honour Dinning in such a manner, joining together with members of his family and his friends.
“Corporal Dinning gave the ultimate sacrifice while serving his country in Afghanistan. It is with great honour and pride that we join together with Corporal Dinning’s family and friends to dedicate this bridge in his honour. We will forever be grateful for his commitment to service,” Delaney said in a statement released on Friday.
Duncan Mackintosh, a friend and colleague of Dinning’s, said Dinning was simply a superior soldier.
“Matthew was very strong in everything that he did; his skill set, his physicality. Everything he did, he did very well and he just seemed to excel without effort,” Mackintosh said in an interview with CKNX. “Driver training in specific, most of us were white-knuckled and straining to keep up at these unbelievable speeds and he looked like he could have had a coffee in his hand most of the time.”
Since 2002, 51 bridges and other highway structures have been dedicated throughout Ontario in memory of police officers killed in the line of duty.
At the time of his death, Dinning was a member of a close protection team, a high-readiness, specialized protective service organization capable of conducting a broad range of special protective missions and tasks both in Canada and abroad.
A play telling Dinning’s story is currently in development at the Blyth Festival. Artistic Director Marion de Vries hopes to produce it in the near future as part of the Festival’s Memorial Series.
A bridge on the Bluewater Veteran’s Highway (Hwy. 21) in Bruce County was dedicated in the name of fallen Wingham soldier Corporal Matthew Dinning on Friday, with a number of members of the Canadian military in Wingham for the event. The dedication ceremony was held at the Wingham Legion, while military members and Dinning’s family also made the trip to the bridge. From left: Chief Warrant Officer Richard Day, Dinning’s grandmother Rhelda Stockall, Dinning’s father Lincoln, Dinning’s mother Laurie, Dinning’s brother Master Corporal Brendon, Dinning’s grandfather Jim Stockall and Colonel R.P. Delaney, Canadian Forces Provost Marshal and Commander of the Canadian Forces Military Police Group. (Cpl. Katherine Quint photo)
At the Wingham Legion on Friday, fallen Corporal Matthew Dinning of Wingham was honoured as a bridge along the Bluewater Veteran’s Highway (Highway 21) was dedicated in his name.
The bridge, which spans Clark Creek in Bruce County, will now be bookended by signs bearing Dinning’s name and the Military Police crest, one at each end of the bridge.
In an interview with CKNX, Matthew’s father Lincoln said the location of the sign, in Bruce County, is one he’s happy with.
“You actually see the Bluewater Veteran’s Highway sign with the poppy and the very next thing you see will be Corporal Matthew Dinning Memorial Bridge, so it is an excellent location,” Dinning said. “We used to drive to Kincardine with the boys for hockey and for swimming and it was great; so, good choice.”
Dinning, a Canadian Armed Forces Military Police member, was killed in the line of duty during a tour of Afghanistan in April, 2006. The incident occurred when the armoured G-Wagon Dinning was travelling in struck a roadside IED (improvised explosive device). Three other soldiers travelling in the vehicle were also killed.
Major Greg Losier, Dinning’s commanding officer at the time, was in Wingham for the unveiling. He told CKNX that Dinning was a true soldier who did everything he did for the miliary.
“For the military, a bridge is something that you cross, an obstacle that allows you to move forward. But a bridge is also, according to Webster’s Dictionary, is a time, place or means of connection. And it’s an apropos memorial for someone who made the ultimate sacrifice, and it’s an absolute privilege we can recognize Matthew,” Losier said.
In a statement released on Friday, Rob Nicholson, Niagara Falls MP and Minister of National Defence, said the program to honour fallen veterans with highway memorials is an important one.
“It is always important to honour the sacrifice of our Canadian Armed Forces and their families. It is with great pride that our government recognizes the strength of those who serve our country, and thanks them for their dedication. It is a fitting commemoration of the sacrifice made by Corporal Dinning to be included as part of the Highway Memorials for Fallen Police Officers,” Nicholson said.
The sign that now stands beside a Bruce County bridge bearing the name of Corporal Matthew Dinning was officially unveiled on Friday at a ceremony held at the Wingham Legion. From left: Master Corporal Brendon Dinning, Colonel R.P. Delaney, Laurie Dinning and Lincoln Dinning. (Cpl. Katherine Quint photo)
Last Updated on Thursday, 24 July 2014 12:17
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First National Cenotaph Day this Monday - July 24 PDF Print E-mail
Written by Shawn Loughlin   
Wednesday, 23 July 2014 14:51
The Blyth Legion and Legion Ladies Auxiliary are preparing to host the first National Cenotaph Day on July 28, a dream that has been in the works since last year’s Campaign 14/19 announcement.
In 2013, Legion President Andy Lubbers explained to The Citizen that Blyth Legion Branch 420 hoped to start this event and, with everything scheduled for July 28, it’s shaping up to be a great day.
“It’s a date that just really will work for Blyth,” Lubbers said in an interview with The Citizen last week. “It’s the anniversary of the first day of World War I, it’s the anniversary of the opening day of Memorial Hall and it’s the day that the 14/19 campaign and the Blyth Memorial Hall upgrades were announced last year.”
The event is planned to honour not only the cenotaphs that represent fallen soldiers, but everyone who has served in the name of Canada, as well as their families.
While the local Legion Branch and Ladies Auxiliary are calling it National Cenotaph Day, the only celebration scheduled so far is in Blyth, but Lubbers hopes it will catch on from there.
“We will start it here in Blyth, but we don’t know how big it goes,” he said. “We hope it will be celebrated nation-wide at some point, but it depends on what other places do in terms of picking it up.”
He said it may take a few years to really grow, but having it in July, when the Blyth Festival is using Blyth Memorial Community Hall for its summer season, will really help spread the word about the event.
Blyth Legion Branch Second Vice-President Crystal Taylor has been in charge of communicating with the Royal Canadian Legion’s dominion and provincial command regarding the event and she said that they support it fully.
“They’re completely behind us,” she said. “They want to see us start it at the grassroots level and grow it from there... A lot of things work like that in the Legion.”
She said both commands want to see a ground swelling from the local branches.
The celebration, which will differ slightly from Remembrance Day, will honour all Canadian veterans.
The ceremony will begin with a parade that will conclude as Legion members lay a wreath at the front of Memorial Hall, a half-hour service will then be held there.
Lubbers said that while many people think of World War I and World War II veterans when it comes to events such as this, he said, with this new celebration especially, people need to remember it’s not just a celebration of those who fought in older conflicts.
“It’s about honouring and remembering our past and those that came before us but it’s also about honouring and remembering our present veterans and soldiers,” he said. “It’s about honouring everyone who does anything to serve this country.”
This year’s service, which is titled “Stories from the Cenotaph”, will feature the Loder family as speakers.
Keith and Linda Loder will take the stage during the ceremony to talk about Linda’s father, Russell Cook, a veteran of World War II who passed away in 2010, and their sons Nathan and Shane, who are both currently serving in the armed forces.
Cook’s story is a unique one in which, as a young man, he fought and was injured twice, the second time driving through Holland to get to Belgium, which was where the nearest allied hosptial was.
Between getting shot twice, being on the beaches of Normandy four days after D-Day and finding his faith, Cook had an amazing story to tell, which he kept to himself for decades.
In a 2009 interview with The Citizen, he explained that for years his memories were too painful to relive to tell them. However, in 2001, that changed when he decided students at Blyth Public School should hear his story.
That connection between those who sacrificed their lives then, those who are sacrificing now and those who benefit, is one of the important connections according Lubbers.
“It’s about connecting the young and the old together,” he said. “That’s why this will work well.
“We should always be honouring the young men and women who serve,” he added. “A veteran is a veteran is a veteran; there’s no divisions.”
The event, which starts at 7 p.m. on July 28, is free to attend and anyone wanting to be involved just needs to show up at Memorial Hall at 7 p.m.
Peter Smith, the committee chair for Campaign 14/19, a project to create a cultural hub in Blyth and modernize the theatre at Blyth’s cenotaph, Memorial Hall, said this is an event he’s been looking forward to for nearly a year.
“This is something we started discussing last year when we made the 14/19 announcement,” Smith said.  “After the announcement, Andy and I talked about creating a day when the cenotaph was honoured.”
He said that, through those conversations, he learned that the day would be about the cenotaph as well as the families of veterans, both past and present.
“When Andy talked about stories about people who were still here when others went off to war, I thought that would be a great idea,” he said. “November 11 [Remembrance Day] is a day we will always remember the soldiers and the veterans, but this is a day for the cenotaph and for the families as well as the veterans.”
Smith said that Taylor, who is also on the 14/19 committee, has done great work on behalf of the Legion and Ladies’ Auxiliary to inform the Royal Canadian Legion’s provincial and dominion command of the event.
“It should be a simple ceremony, but a great ceremony,” Smith said.
The Blyth Legion and Legion Ladies Auxiliary are preparing to host the first National Cenotaph Day on July 28, a dream that has been in the works since last year’s Campaign 14/19 announcement.
In 2013, Legion President Andy Lubbers explained to The Citizen that Blyth Legion Branch 420 hoped to start this event and, with everything scheduled for July 28, it’s shaping up to be a great day.
“It’s a date that just really will work for Blyth,” Lubbers said in an interview with The Citizen last week. “It’s the anniversary of the first day of World War I, it’s the anniversary of the opening day of Memorial Hall and it’s the day that the 14/19 campaign and the Blyth Memorial Hall upgrades were announced last year.”
The event is planned to honour not only the cenotaphs that represent fallen soldiers, but everyone who has served in the name of Canada, as well as their families.
While the local Legion Branch and Ladies Auxiliary are calling it National Cenotaph Day, the only celebration scheduled so far is in Blyth, but Lubbers hopes it will catch on from there.
“We will start it here in Blyth, but we don’t know how big it goes,” he said. “We hope it will be celebrated nation-wide at some point, but it depends on what other places do in terms of picking it up.”
He said it may take a few years to really grow, but having it in July, when the Blyth Festival is using Blyth Memorial Community Hall for its summer season, will really help spread the word about the event.
Blyth Legion Branch Second Vice-President Crystal Taylor has been in charge of communicating with the Royal Canadian Legion’s dominion and provincial command regarding the event and she said that they support it fully.
“They’re completely behind us,” she said. “They want to see us start it at the grassroots level and grow it from there... A lot of things work like that in the Legion.”
She said both commands want to see a ground swelling from the local branches.
The celebration, which will differ slightly from Remembrance Day, will honour all Canadian veterans.
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Bluevale 160th Homecoming a Success - July 24 PDF Print E-mail
Written by Shawn Loughlin   
Wednesday, 23 July 2014 14:46
The Bluevale 160th homecoming was held this past weekend at the Bluevale baseball diamond and throughout the village and organizer Brian Schlosser said that everything lined up to make the weekend successful.
“Everything went very well,” he said. “You couldn’t ask for better weather, and, while we didn’t count how many were there, we had a very good crowd... We were very happy with the numbers.”
The antique car and implement show brought out 49 cars and about a dozen tractors, the parade featured 101 floats and the horseshoe and bottle toss competitions were very well attended with the latter being completely filled.
“The parade went off without a hitch, there were lots of great floats and three different sets of horses,” Schlosser said.
The dunk tank, which was originally going to feature local targets, became more of a fun location for youth who even trained a local dog to act as a ball retriever for them.
“The kids just loved it,” Schlosser said. “They had a hoot.”
Musical entertainment was well attended and appreciated, Schlosser said, as was the children’s entertainment on Saturday and the jam sessions on both Saturday and Sunday.
Local youth groups helped to clean up the park after the event and got to turn in anything they found, including beverage containers and did a great job according to Schlosser.
“The park is spotless,” he said. “They did a fantastic job.”
Schlosser added that thanks needed to go to McGavin Farm Equipment Ltd. for providing some people movers for the event.
Merchandise is still available from the event including t-shirts, though Schlosser said the supply is dwindling fast. For more information, contact him at This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
The Ryan family was busy on Saturday morning at the Bluevale 160th Homecoming parade as they worked to welcome everyone to the 2017 International Plowing Match to be held on Jack Ryan’s Walton-area farm. Sure, it’s still a few years away, but it’s never too early to get people interested in an event. Joe Ryan, Jack’s son, led the group, followed by a trio of cool-looking customers. (Emily Manns photo)
The Bluevale 160th homecoming was held this past weekend at the Bluevale baseball diamond and throughout the village and organizer Brian Schlosser said that everything lined up to make the weekend successful.
“Everything went very well,” he said. “You couldn’t ask for better weather, and, while we didn’t count how many were there, we had a very good crowd... We were very happy with the numbers.”
The antique car and implement show brought out 49 cars and about a dozen tractors, the parade featured 101 floats and the horseshoe and bottle toss competitions were very well attended with the latter being completely filled.
“The parade went off without a hitch, there were lots of great floats and three different sets of horses,” Schlosser said.
The dunk tank, which was originally going to feature local targets, became more of a fun location for youth who even trained a local dog to act as a ball retriever for them.
“The kids just loved it,” Schlosser said. “They had a hoot.”
Musical entertainment was well attended and appreciated, Schlosser said, as was the children’s entertainment on Saturday and the jam sessions on both Saturday and Sunday.
Local youth groups helped to clean up the park after the event and got to turn in anything they found, including beverage containers and did a great job according to Schlosser.
“The park is spotless,” he said. “They did a fantastic job.”
Last Updated on Thursday, 24 July 2014 12:13
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North Huron CAO Gary Long Resigns - July 24 PDF Print E-mail
Written by Shawn Loughlin   
Wednesday, 23 July 2014 14:43
North Huron Township Council’s July 21 meeting was one of goodbyes as Deputy-Reeve David Riach officially announced his resignation, followed by a similar announcement by Chief Administrative Officer (CAO) Gary Long.
“Last week I notified council and staff that I’m resigning as CAO/Clerk for North Huron to take a similar position with the Municipality of Bluewater,” Long announced. “My new job starts Sept. 2. I will be here over the next six weeks to tidy up loose ends and make sure it’s a smooth and seamless transition.”
Long said that, while he didn’t wish to steal any of Riach’s spotlight, he did feel it had been an honour and a privilege working with council and he wanted to be open about the transition.
“I have thoroughly enjoyed working with council,” he said, adding he has also enjoyed working collaboratively with community stakeholders.
Riach, during his resignation speech, had presented a list of things he was proud of over the last four years and Long echoed that sentiment, but said he wouldn’t repeat them, only point out how many people are involved in such projects.
“There are very few things at town hall that can be attributed to one person,” he said. “We’re a team, everyone has a role to play.”
He said he has worked provincially and federally and, when the opportunity to work municipally came up, he took it and has enjoyed the work.
“I get a lot of satisfaction working municipally, working at the local level,” he said. “I believe that staff, the council and the community have the opportunity to make an impact and make a difference here at the community level.”
He said council can’t make these projects work on its own and neither can staff and that is his motivation every day: to help push those projects forward and “get something done on a daily basis.”
Councillor Bernie Bailey thanked Long for his service and for always being a consummate professional.
“I came on to council completely green,” he said. “I hit the road with a lot of thunder, but I had to find my way. The staff, especially Gary, was always there for me.”
Bailey said that Long was always available to talk with and he appreciated that. “Even if we were at opposite ends of the spear, it was always business, there was never a personal rattling. I can’t tell you how much I appreciate that.”
Bailey said that his three and a half years on council have been better because of Long’s knowledge and work and said that, no matter how angry he got, Long could calm the situation down and help it move forward.
“We understood each other, I think, and I can’t thank you enough,” he said.
Other council members echoed that sentiment and wished Long well in his future endeavours.
In a brief interview with The Citizen, after the meeting, Long said that he has enjoyed his five years at North Huron but it was time for a change of scenery.
North Huron Township Council’s July 21 meeting was one of goodbyes as Deputy-Reeve David Riach officially announced his resignation, followed by a similar announcement by Chief Administrative Officer (CAO) Gary Long.
“Last week I notified council and staff that I’m resigning as CAO/Clerk for North Huron to take a similar position with the Municipality of Bluewater,” Long announced. “My new job starts Sept. 2. I will be here over the next six weeks to tidy up loose ends and make sure it’s a smooth and seamless transition.”
Long said that, while he didn’t wish to steal any of Riach’s spotlight, he did feel it had been an honour and a privilege working with council and he wanted to be open about the transition.
“I have thoroughly enjoyed working with council,” he said, adding he has also enjoyed working collaboratively with community stakeholders.
Riach, during his resignation speech, had presented a list of things he was proud of over the last four years and Long echoed that sentiment, but said he wouldn’t repeat them, only point out how many people are involved in such projects.
“There are very few things at town hall that can be attributed to one person,” he said. “We’re a team, everyone has a role to play.”
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North Huron's Neil Vincent Announces He'll Run Again - July 24 PDF Print E-mail
Written by Shawn Loughlin   
Wednesday, 23 July 2014 14:35
At North Huron Council’s July 21 meeting Reeve Neil Vincent announced he would indeed be running for re-election this fall.
Vincent’s participation in the election, set for Oct. 27, was uncertain as, earlier this year he ran for the Liberal Party of Ontario nomination for the Huron-Bruce riding, but was defeated by Avon Maitland District School Board trustee Colleen Schenk.
“As for my intentions for the Oct. 27 municipal election, I said I would make a decision in July,” Vincent said during his reeve’s report at the meeting. “That decision is I will be filing my name and running for the position of reeve again.”
Vincent said that he would be able to “provide connectivity” as to where the township currently sits on several different projects and help carry forward the intentions of the current council.
As of press time, no one else had expressed definite interest or filed papers to run against Vincent.
At North Huron Council’s July 21 meeting Reeve Neil Vincent announced he would indeed be running for re-election this fall.
Vincent’s participation in the election, set for Oct. 27, was uncertain as, earlier this year he ran for the Liberal Party of Ontario nomination for the Huron-Bruce riding, but was defeated by Avon Maitland District School Board trustee Colleen Schenk.
“As for my intentions for the Oct. 27 municipal election, I said I would make a decision in July,” Vincent said during his reeve’s report at the meeting. “That decision is I will be filing my name and running for the position of reeve again.”
Vincent said that he would be able to “provide connectivity” as to where the township currently sits on several different projects and help carry forward the intentions of the current council.
As of press time, no one else had expressed definite interest or filed papers to run against Vincent.
 
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