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Weather Holds For Another Great Brussels Fall Fair - Sept. 25 PDF Print E-mail
Written by Shawn Loughlin   
Wednesday, 24 September 2014 14:22
While entries were down across the board at this year’s Brussels Fall Fair, Nicole Noble of the Brussels Agricultural Society says it was a great two days for the community.
One of the biggest concerns going into the fair, Noble said, was the parade with the extensive construction currently making the village’s main street an impossible route for the parade. She said the alternative route worked out well, running from the Optimist Ballpark down Sports Drive to Ainley Street and then back to the Brussels, Morris and Grey Community Centre.
Noble said that while the number of floats was down, it was great to once again see a large number of school children marching in the parade.
The fair began on Tuesday night with the opening ceremonies and the now-annual dog show. The dog show showcased seven dogs, which Noble said was a pretty good showing.
It continued with the celebrity cake-decorating competition, which included Fall Fair Ambassador Jamee Johnston, Brussels Fire Chief Murray McArter and several others.
Noble reported that it was McArter’s cake that raised the highest amount of money at auction. The competition as a whole raised nearly $300 for the Brussels Agricultural Society.
On Wednesday, she said, many of the student programs were well received, including the flying demonstration and the 4-H shows. The inflatables, which were instituted last year in place of the midway, were also another hit, going over well with the community’s children.
One aspect of the fair that definitely went over well, Noble said, was the food. She said that the food booth sold out both days, with 55 pies flying out the fair’s doors over the two days, which is 10 more than were made last year. The theme baskets were also a hit once again this year.
Noble said the fair wouldn’t be possible without the hard work of the volunteers who made pies, often donating them, and who donating their time at the fair.
“Without our volunteers, I honestly don’t know where our fair would be,” Noble said.
While most of the competition at this year’s Brussels Fall Fair, held last week at the Brussels, Morris and Grey Community Centre and the Brussels Fairgrounds, was serious, there was plenty of time for fun competition as well. Here, a trio of contestants participate in the 4-H Sheep Club’s annual costume competition where both sheep and showperson were expected to be in costume. For a full gallery of pictures, click here. (Denny Scott photo)
While entries were down across the board at this year’s Brussels Fall Fair, Nicole Noble of the Brussels Agricultural Society says it was a great two days for the community.
One of the biggest concerns going into the fair, Noble said, was the parade with the extensive construction currently making the village’s main street an impossible route for the parade. She said the alternative route worked out well, running from the Optimist Ballpark down Sports Drive to Ainley Street and then back to the Brussels, Morris and Grey Community Centre.
Noble said that while the number of floats was down, it was great to once again see a large number of school children marching in the parade.
The fair began on Tuesday night with the opening ceremonies and the now-annual dog show. The dog show showcased seven dogs, which Noble said was a pretty good showing.
It continued with the celebrity cake-decorating competition, which included Fall Fair Ambassador Jamee Johnston, Brussels Fire Chief Murray McArter and several others.
Noble reported that it was McArter’s cake that raised the highest amount of money at auction. The competition as a whole raised nearly $300 for the Brussels Agricultural Society.
Last Updated on Wednesday, 24 September 2014 17:28
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Hullett Shooting Suspect Makes Goderich Court Appearance - Sept. 25 PDF Print E-mail
Written by Shawn Loughlin   
Wednesday, 24 September 2014 14:17
On Sunday, the OPP arrested 70-year-old Boris Panovski of Scarborough as he attempted to re-enter Canada at Toronto’s Pearson International Airport. Panovski was then charged with one count of first degree murder and one count of attempted murder in connection with the Sept. 13 shooting of Donato Frigo near the Hullett Wildlife Conservation Area.
A Canada-wide warrant had been issued for Panovski earlier in the week. According to a press release from the OPP, Panovski was arrested without incident and appeared at the Goderich courthouse on Monday.
Panovski asked members of the media how he looked as he entered the courthouse wearing a lime green shirt and blue jeans. A publication ban has been imposed on all evidence to be given at the trial.
Panovski’s next appearance will be on Oct. 6 by video.
Police held a press conference in Vaughan Friday morning where OPP Detective-Superintendent Dave Truax named Panovski the suspect in what Truax called a “complex criminal investigation”.
Truax said the investigation led them to a residence in Scarborough, where the OPP, alongside the Toronto Police Homicide Squad and members of Toronto’s 43 Division, executed a search warrant on Sept. 17. During that search, Truax said, the OPP recovered a number of items that have since been transferred to Centre of Forensic Sciences in Toronto for expert examination. He could not elaborate as to what items were recovered, saying it would be a point of evidence.
“A great deal of police response and criminal investigation work has transpired to bring us to where we are today,” Truax said. “Due to the fact that the accused is still not in custody and this investigation is still unfolding, I am somewhat limited in providing additional information.”
When asked about the condition of the female victim, Truax said he was not at liberty to discuss her condition, but assured members of the collected media that she is in a place of safety. Police have still yet to confirm that the female victim was Frigo’s wife, Eva Willer, which has been widely reported by numerous media outlets.
Truax did confirm that Panovski and Frigo were known to one another, but could not elaborate any further as to the details of their relationship.
Truax did confirm that both Frigo and the female victim were on horseback at the time of the shooting and were involved in dog training exercises.
“Without getting into great detail of those events, an altercation occurred between the individual who has been identified, whom which we have a warrant for his arrest, and the victim and the female who was in his company,” he said.
Reporting indicates that while the woman was wounded, she was able to flee on horseback and get to a place of safety.
Frigo has been referred to as “royalty” in the Ontario competitive hunting dog community of which, sources tell The Citizen, Panovski is also a member. Sources indicate that Panovski owns several English Setters.
The London Free Press has reported a connection between Panovski and Frigo, writing that Panovski sold Frigo a small pointer puppy named Silver in 2000.
When asked if there was any threat to public safety the night of the shooting, or in the subsequent days, Truax said that a great deal of police resources were deployed to the area to alleviate any concerns with public safety.
“Public safety is paramount, there were also concerns in relation to officer safety as well and as this event unfolded an update was subsequently provided when appropriate and once public safety was assured,” he said.
Truax said that a number of witnesses have been interviewed as the investigation has been ongoing, which led police to the Greater Toronto Area.
“As a result of the information that has been learned in the investigation conducted led us to a residence in Scarborough,” Truax said.
After being asked about the amount of information that was released to residents in immediate proximity to the Hullett Wildlife Conservation Area, Truax said police had to achieve a delicate balance between the investigation and keeping the public informed. He indicated that the suspect’s monitoring of the media was also a factor.
“When a police operation like that is underway, there needs to be a balance in relation to the information that is broadcast widely to the public. Keeping in mind the circumstances of the event, keeping in mind that the suspect involved in the incident could also be monitoring media as well, those are discussions that are ongoing as an event like this unfolds. We certainly recognize our duty to inform the media of our actions and to ensure public safety, because that is first and foremost our focus,” he said.
Truax would not confirm that a manhunt had occurred in the days following the shooting, just that due to the nature of the crime scene, a conservation area, police efforts were widespread.
“In relation to the initial response, obviously the crime scene is adjacent to a conservation area, so that conservation area needed to be, for lack of a better term, cleared. We needed to assure as to whether one or more persons were involved in this matter; all those types of things, so that is part of the response to this matter as well,” he said.
Last week the OPP released the name and image of 70-year-old Boris Panovski, who is charged with first degree murder in the case of Donato Frigo and one count of attempted murder.
On Sunday, the OPP arrested 70-year-old Boris Panovski of Scarborough as he attempted to re-enter Canada at Toronto’s Pearson International Airport. Panovski was then charged with one count of first degree murder and one count of attempted murder in connection with the Sept. 13 shooting of Donato Frigo near the Hullett Wildlife Conservation Area.
A Canada-wide warrant had been issued for Panovski earlier in the week. According to a press release from the OPP, Panovski was arrested without incident and appeared at the Goderich courthouse on Monday.
Panovski asked members of the media how he looked as he entered the courthouse wearing a lime green shirt and blue jeans. A publication ban has been imposed on all evidence to be given at the trial.
Panovski’s next appearance will be on Oct. 6 by video.
Police held a press conference in Vaughan Friday morning where OPP Detective-Superintendent Dave Truax named Panovski the suspect in what Truax called a “complex criminal investigation”.
Truax said the investigation led them to a residence in Scarborough, where the OPP, alongside the Toronto Police Homicide Squad and members of Toronto’s 43 Division, executed a search warrant on Sept. 17. During that search, Truax said, the OPP recovered a number of items that have since been transferred to Centre of Forensic Sciences in Toronto for expert examination. He could not elaborate as to what items were recovered, saying it would be a point of evidence.
“A great deal of police response and criminal investigation work has transpired to bring us to where we are today,” Truax said. “Due to the fact that the accused is still not in custody and this investigation is still unfolding, I am somewhat limited in providing additional information.”
When asked about the condition of the female victim, Truax said he was not at liberty to discuss her condition, but assured members of the collected media that she is in a place of safety. Police have still yet to confirm that the female victim was Frigo’s wife, Eva Willer, which has been widely reported by numerous media outlets.
Truax did confirm that Panovski and Frigo were known to one another, but could not elaborate any further as to the details of their relationship.
Truax did confirm that both Frigo and the female victim were on horseback at the time of the shooting and were involved in dog training exercises.
Last Updated on Wednesday, 24 September 2014 17:24
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Local Athlete Sets Sights on 2020 Olympics - Sept. 25 PDF Print E-mail
Written by Shawn Loughlin   
Wednesday, 24 September 2014 14:13
Lexi Aitken recently returned from China where she competed in the 400-metre hurdles at the Youth Olympic Games.
Despite a sixth-place finish with a 1:00.27 time, Aitken said she was proud of her participation at the event and was glad she was able to be there.
“It was such a different experience,” she said. “We had to adapt to so many different things. It was really fun and an experience I’m not soon going to forget.”
In mid-August, Aitken boarded a plane for China to prepare for the event.
“We had two days to get used to the jet lag then we trained for a week before the meet started,” she said. “I had practices every day, then we competed, then we had a day off before the next competition, then a practice day in between.”
The entire event took three days between the heats and the finals for all the runners to participate. It was hectic, but with the support she had at the event, Aitken said it went well.
“It was good, there was a lot of stress but I had my teammates watching me,” she said, adding that her whole family, including her grandparents were there to cheer her on. “That was awesome, it was really nice having them there.”
If competing against international talent wasn’t enough stress, Aitken said that the stage that they were competing on certainly added some pressure.
“The competition was just crazy,” she said. “I’ve never run in front of so many people before. The stadium was completely packed, it was amazing.”
Outside of the competition, Aitken said being in China was a great experience.
“The Chinese were such great hosts and I’m glad that we had a week to do the tourist thing and see lots of sights and meet the people,” she said. “My family also got to see China which is cool because not a lot of people really end up going there.”
As for the future, Aitken is taking some time off before she begins to prepare for other events like the Pan Am Juniors competition in Edmonton in 2015. While a date has yet to be announced, the games are traditionally held in the summer. This will mark the first time in 10 years that the biennial games have been held in Canada.
She said that she is going to relax for September and October then start to prepare for the indoor competitions which typically begin in January.
Aitken also just started Grade 12 and is looking to go to the U.S. to continue her running experience and turn it into a career.
“I don’t have any specific school I’m looking at just yet, but it will definitely be in the States,” she said. “I keep visiting schools and each visit changes what I think I might want.”
As for why she is aiming for the U.S., Aitken claims that there are better opportunities there.
“Canada is great but they only have [the Canadian Interuniversity Sport organization],” she said. “The United States gives more opportunities with the [National Collegiate Athletic Association] and have some really great coaches.”
Central Huron’s Lexi Aitken said that when she competed in the Youth Olympics in China this summer, it was the largest crowd she’s ever competed in front of. Her sights are now set on a scholarship at a high-ranking American school where she can attempt to make track and field her chosen career. (Photo submitted)
Lexi Aitken recently returned from China where she competed in the 400-metre hurdles at the Youth Olympic Games.
Despite a sixth-place finish with a 1:00.27 time, Aitken said she was proud of her participation at the event and was glad she was able to be there.
“It was such a different experience,” she said. “We had to adapt to so many different things. It was really fun and an experience I’m not soon going to forget.”
In mid-August, Aitken boarded a plane for China to prepare for the event.
“We had two days to get used to the jet lag then we trained for a week before the meet started,” she said. “I had practices every day, then we competed, then we had a day off before the next competition, then a practice day in between.”
The entire event took three days between the heats and the finals for all the runners to participate. It was hectic, but with the support she had at the event, Aitken said it went well.
“It was good, there was a lot of stress but I had my teammates watching me,” she said, adding that her whole family, including her grandparents were there to cheer her on. “That was awesome, it was really nice having them there.”
If competing against international talent wasn’t enough stress, Aitken said that the stage that they were competing on certainly added some pressure.
“The competition was just crazy,” she said. “I’ve never run in front of so many people before. The stadium was completely packed, it was amazing.”
Outside of the competition, Aitken said being in China was a great experience.
“The Chinese were such great hosts and I’m glad that we had a week to do the tourist thing and see lots of sights and meet the people,” she said. “My family also got to see China which is cool because not a lot of people really end up going there.”
Lexi Aitken of Central Huron was in tough against the competition at the Youth Olympics in China last month, but she held her own, and hopes to continue doing so with a track and field scholarship to an American university. (Photo submitted)
Last Updated on Wednesday, 24 September 2014 17:35
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Morris-Turnberry Rejects Servicing Agreement - Sept. 25 PDF Print E-mail
Written by Shawn Loughlin   
Wednesday, 24 September 2014 14:09
Morris-Turnberry Council members want their North Huron counterparts to know they are at an impasse with cross-border servicing.
North Huron recently enacted a bylaw that would see significant changes to the way it charges its neighbours for infrastructure service that extends beyond its borders, however, despite early optimism about modernizing the agreement, Morris-Turnberry council was not happy with the final result.
In a letter sent to North Huron, Mayor Paul Gowing, speaking on behalf of Morris-Turnberry Council says council was not satisfied with how costing was determined for the new cross-border servicing agreement, pointing specifically to a demand from North Huron that it should receive 30 per cent of any tax collected by Morris-Turnberry (not including tax for the school board or the county) on land serviced by its infrastructure.
“There are examples of positive agreements out there,” Gowing said during Morris-Turnberry’s Sept. 16 meeting. “It can work.”
Gowing, in the letter, states Morris-Turnberry “has no intention of making any payments to North Huron for 30 per cent of the municipal portion of property taxes for new development” and added that council is considering legal action, if necessary, to veto the existing policy.
The press release states, if the current system doesn’t raise enough funds, then water and sewer rates should be looked at, not taxation on a neighbouring municipality. If, however, North Huron were to raise the water and sewer rates, that would be on top of an increase council approved earlier this year. Such an increase would affect all system users, both in North Huron and outside of it.
Through the letter, Gowing claims the policy is “not fair or equitable” and “will eliminate future development and hinders growth for development on current properties.” It goes on to say North Huron Council is not listening when Morris-Turnberry Council has stated those facts and is not willing to negotiate.
“This is a step in the wrong direction for the Northern Huron County area,” Gowing writes, adding his council is hopeful talks can start again between the two municipal governments with the new term of council beginning later this year.
Morris-Turnberry Council members want their North Huron counterparts to know they are at an impasse with cross-border servicing.
North Huron recently enacted a bylaw that would see significant changes to the way it charges its neighbours for infrastructure service that extends beyond its borders, however, despite early optimism about modernizing the agreement, Morris-Turnberry council was not happy with the final result.
In a letter sent to North Huron, Mayor Paul Gowing, speaking on behalf of Morris-Turnberry Council says council was not satisfied with how costing was determined for the new cross-border servicing agreement, pointing specifically to a demand from North Huron that it should receive 30 per cent of any tax collected by Morris-Turnberry (not including tax for the school board or the county) on land serviced by its infrastructure.
“There are examples of positive agreements out there,” Gowing said during Morris-Turnberry’s Sept. 16 meeting. “It can work.”
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Movies - Sept. 26 PDF Print E-mail
Written by Shawn Loughlin   
Wednesday, 24 September 2014 14:00

At the Park Theatre in Goderich

Phone: 519-524-7811 or 1-800-265-3438 (Toll Free)

Movies run from Friday, September 26 to Thursday, October 2.

 

THE MAZE RUNNER

Thomas (Dylan O'Brien) is a teenage who's brought to a massive maze called The Glade, which is surrounded by vicious creatures known as Grievers. He and a group of other teenage boys hoping to solve the maze have no memories of anything that happened before they came to the maze. However, they realize that a sting from a Griever can help them recall memories from the past. The boys soon start working together in an attempt to escape.

Starring Dylan O'Brien, Kaya Scodelario, Thomas Brodie-Sangster, Will Poulter and Patricia Clarkson.

Rated PG

Show times

Friday and Saturday, 6:45 p.m. and 9:15 p.m.

Sunday to Thursday, 7:30 p.m.

 

THIS IS WHERE I LEAVE YOU

When Judd's father dies, the family re-assembles for the first time in years, but Judd's wife is notably absent. Members of the family then fulfill their father's dying wish and spend seven days sitting Shivah together when secrets are revealed and grudges come out.

Starring Jason Bateman, Tina Fey, Adam Driver, Rose Byrne, Corey Stoll, Kathryn Hahn, Connie Britton, Timothy Olyphant, Dax Shepard and Jane Fonda.

Rated 14A

Show times

Friday and Saturday, 6:45 p.m. and 9:15 p.m.

Sunday to Thursday, 7:30 p.m.