Search our Advertisers



Banner
Banner
Fare on 4 Dazzles Diners, Delights Community - Aug. 28 PDF Print E-mail
Written by Shawn Loughlin   
Wednesday, 27 August 2014 12:44
The road is open, the tables are cleared and the dust has settled and the reviews are coming in stating that Campaign 14/19’s record-setting Fare on 4 was a hit.
“We pulled it off,” said Campaign 14/19 Administrator Karen Stewart.
Stewart, who is being credited by everyone involved as doing the impossible by arranging the entire meal, said that everything came together as well as organizers could have hoped, a sentiment that was echoed by others.
“It was awesome, just unbelievable really,” Jason Rutledge, Chef of the Blyth Inn said. “I”m still flabbergasted at what happened and how smoothly it all came together.”
“It was amazing,” Peter Gusso, Chef of Part II Bistro said. “There’s an old saying about chefs that you either have a good service or a bad service and that was the best service I’ve ever had.”
Rutledge and Gusso were the head chefs for Fare on 4, which saw 1,419 people seated along Blyth’s Queen Street for a massive outdoor meal.
Featuring as much local meat and produce as possible, the meal has been counted as a success by everyone who The Citizen has spoken to and, according to Rutledge, that’s because of all the volunteers who helped out.
“We just couldn’t have done it without all the people who helped out,” he said. “Norpac Beef brought us meat smokers, the Lions let us use their barbecue, the volunteers just really saved us.”
Gusso agreed, saying the prep work was all done perfectly, the serving was amazing and everything that could have gone right did.
“I’m still in awe,” he said. “I can’t believe it went so, so well. Everything I have heard about it is positive.”
Approximately 100 people helped with the meal between volunteers doing prep work and actually serving the meal, and that number included Smith, Rutledge and their respective staffs.
“I’m just dumbfounded on how well everything went,” Rutledge said.
More than the volunteers, however, Rutledge said the thanks had to go to the 1,419 people who not only showed interest, but bought a ticket and the people beyond that who sponsored tables. It wasn’t until those tables were set up did Rutledge and Gusso realize what they were dealing with.
“That was about the time I got nervous,” Rutledge said. “I’m still amazed we pulled it off.”
Rutledge, Stewart and Gusso said thanks also went out to The Warrington Eating House of Listowel who, despite only being open for a few weeks, showed up in numbers to help with the event.
Thanks also went to G.L. Hubbard Rutabagas who donated rutabagas for every table that disappeared by the end of the night and the former Davara Studios which donated small 14/19 ornaments.
Even with all the support, it still took more than two days to prepare for the event with volunteers cutting vegetables and mushrooms on Friday morning at the Blyth and District Community Centre right up to Sunday morning when the dishes were being prepared.
“We had to bring all the food into the Blyth Inn and get things to the right temperature,” Gusso explained. “Tomatoes are better at room temperature so they needed time to warm up and came in first. Then we brought in the strawberries and custard and set out 42 bins, each with 35 cups to make 1,470 desserts.”
After that the desserts were topped and Gusso said that the volunteers started to arrive.
“With the volunteers there, we started to set up Jason’s restaurant with two long tables so we could start preparing the appetizers,” he said. “We had plates set out with a piece of bread on it then another plate on top of that, then bruscetta on that plate.”
The two tables didn’t provide quite enough room, however, and volunteers were called in to hold some of the appetizers while more were prepared.
“After that, we started cooking the potatoes,” Gusso explained. “We had potatoes on the barbecue, in my ovens, in Jason’s ovens and in Jason’s pizza ovens. Pretty much anything that generated heat had potatoes in it.”
At 4 p.m. more volunteers started to show up and an orientation session was held for the waiters and waitresses followed by an orientation session for the cooks.
“After that, it was a matter of making the food and getting it out to the people at the tables,” Gusso said. “It was great because everyone did their part and that made it smooth.”
He went on to say that, while it was a busy day, it was mostly stress-free.
“We hoped for that really,” Gusso said. “Jason and I knew we were good, that we were ready and that we would be fine, but I don’t think either of us knew that it would work this well.”
He added that he would gladly work with Rutledge, as well as all the volunteers, ‘any day of the week’ after everything went so smoothly.
That sentiment was carried throughout the event as Stewart said that everything else came together perfectly to make the event a success.
“The food was hot, the weather was beautiful, the people were social and the volunteers were plentiful,” she said. “It was just fantastic. Sure there were a few things to tweak for next year but, from a planning standpoint, everything was perfect.”
Campaign 14/19 Committee Chair Peter Smith said everything working, however, was no accident and all that was left to chance was the weather.
“That event coming together was due to the amount of work and planning put in by the volunteers and by Karen,” he said. “It was like a military campaign in its precision and that precision is going to keep the event going. Beyond that, there was just a little bit of magic from all the people working together.”
Smith went on to say that, any time there was anything that needed to be done, people just jumped on it. There was no waiting, no asking permission and no delegation. If something was out of place, people were on it immediately to fix it.
“That kind of spontaneity in volunteerism is what makes everything work,” he said. “Those small moments where, when anything wasn’t exactly right, three people were on it making it right.”
Smith said that, while he was blown away by how well things worked, he also knew local politicians at all levels were blown away if not by attending it then by the reports after the fact. He said that will go a long way towards finding support for other events.
As far as next year is concerned, as much as some organizers may feel it’s too soon to even be looking at it, there are a few changes being considered including more stations to pick up beverages and some other minor changes.
Beyond that, the only comment that Stewart, Smith, Gusso or Rutledge had to make was about their favourite moment of the night.
While Rutledge said he was a bit shy about the success, the other three all said when Rutledge and Gusso started walking the length of the tables to check on everyone, and a spontaneous, organic standing ovation followed them, it was an amazing moment.
“It was just crazy,” Smith said, a description that was shared by Gusso.
“Once it started, we just had to follow it all the way to the end, but it was just crazy that it started and that everyone joined in,” Smith said.
Fare on 4, a Campaign 14/19 initiative to feed 1,419 people on Blyth’s main street was a resounding success on Sunday evening as food was delivered hot and Mother Nature co-operated with beautiful weather. The event, as seen here from the top floor of The Blyth Inn, stretched nearly to Radford’s Gas Bar in the south, left, and to the Blyth post office in the north, right. It was made possible by the hard work of approximately 100 volunteers and a number of staff members from The Blyth Inn and Part II Bistro. The night’s hardest working men, however, were chefs Peter Gusso and Jason Rutledge who worked overtime to make the meal happen. To see a gallery of pictures from the event, click here. (Denny Scott photos)
The road is open, the tables are cleared and the dust has settled and the reviews are coming in stating that Campaign 14/19’s record-setting Fare on 4 was a hit.
“We pulled it off,” said Campaign 14/19 Administrator Karen Stewart.
Stewart, who is being credited by everyone involved as doing the impossible by arranging the entire meal, said that everything came together as well as organizers could have hoped, a sentiment that was echoed by others.
“It was awesome, just unbelievable really,” Jason Rutledge, Chef of the Blyth Inn said. “I”m still flabbergasted at what happened and how smoothly it all came together.”
“It was amazing,” Peter Gusso, Chef of Part II Bistro said. “There’s an old saying about chefs that you either have a good service or a bad service and that was the best service I’ve ever had.”
Rutledge and Gusso were the head chefs for Fare on 4, which saw 1,419 people seated along Blyth’s Queen Street for a massive outdoor meal.
Featuring as much local meat and produce as possible, the meal has been counted as a success by everyone who The Citizen has spoken to and, according to Rutledge, that’s because of all the volunteers who helped out.
“We just couldn’t have done it without all the people who helped out,” he said. “Norpac Beef brought us meat smokers, the Lions let us use their barbecue, the volunteers just really saved us.”
Gusso agreed, saying the prep work was all done perfectly, the serving was amazing and everything that could have gone right did.
“I’m still in awe,” he said. “I can’t believe it went so, so well. Everything I have heard about it is positive.”
Approximately 100 people helped with the meal between volunteers doing prep work and actually serving the meal, and that number included Smith, Rutledge and their respective staffs.
“I’m just dumbfounded on how well everything went,” Rutledge said.
More than the volunteers, however, Rutledge said the thanks had to go to the 1,419 people who not only showed interest, but bought a ticket and the people beyond that who sponsored tables. It wasn’t until those tables were set up did Rutledge and Gusso realize what they were dealing with.
Last Updated on Thursday, 28 August 2014 11:37
Read more...
 
Walton Proves Excellent Ploughing Match Host - Aug. 28 PDF Print E-mail
Written by Shawn Loughlin   
Wednesday, 27 August 2014 12:38
Huron County Plowmen’s Association President Brian McGavin says this year’s Huron County Ploughing Match was everything he hoped it would be and more, despite concerns about weather early last week.
McGavin said he received a number of positive comments about the level of competition, the site and the hospitality that Huron County displayed and he’s so proud of his community and all of the people involved in making the match happen.
The attendance numbers were about what McGavin expected, he said, as were the number of competitive participants, but what surprised him was from how far some of the participants came.
“We had people come from Peterborough, from Owen Sound and then from the south,” McGavin said. “It was great to see.”
McGavin said that not only did he receive a lot of positive comments about this year’s match, but he also heard from a lot of people who are already looking forward to the 2017 International Plowing Match, which will be held in Walton.
McGavin says he was told on numerous occasions that if the Huron County match at the home of Val Shortreed and family and Matt Shortreed and family was any indication, the 2017 match is going to be one for the ages.
As for the Shortreeds, McGavin says he had high expectations for the family as hosts, but exceeded them.
“You couldn’t have asked for better hosts,” McGavin said. “If you needed anything, they would drop whatever they were doing to help.”
McGavin said that the family had even structured the property’s sheds to coincide with the match’s needs and really went out of their way to make the site the best it could possibly be for the match.
The Shortreeds, he said, took a lot of pride in the site and in hosting the match, so it’s not surprising that they put so much effort into making the match great.
Participation in other aspects of the match also came in above expectations, McGavin said, with the youth of the community coming out in full force.
“We had 20 kids out to participate in our Sodbusters activities, which was great,” McGavin said. He also said that the number of participants for the Princess and Queen of the Furrow competitions were great. He said that while in neighbouring counties there may be one or two young women vying for the Queen of the Furrow crown, in Huron County there are typically between four and seven participants, which is always encouraging to see, he said.
McGavin said that this year he certainly wouldn’t have been wanting to sit in a judge’s chair, as all of the speeches he heard were great.
He made sure to compliment the Townsend family on their great handling of the Princess competition, which has proven to be a great character builder in Huron County.
McGavin said that while all of the Princess and Queen of the Furrow contestants were great, the two winners, Natalie Fear and Ursina Studhalter, respectively, will both represent Huron County well in the next year.
Winners at this year’s match are: Kevin Haney, Senior Champion; Steve Haney, Senior Reserve; Darcy Fear, Junior Champion; Shawn Ryan, Junior Reserve; Darcy Fear, Warden Award (Junior Champion); Scott Baan, Ross Gordon Memorial Award (best crown at junior match); Lucas Townsend, William Leeming Memorial Award (best finish at junior match); Darcy Fear, McGavin Family Award (highest score in classes 2-4); Tom Evans, Don Dodds Award (highest visitor’s score); Darcy Fear, Val-Lea Farms Award (youngest participant from Huron County); John Dekroon, Best Going Plough Team; Ken Milligan, antique ploughing champion; Scott Baan, Top Plough Person – Junior Day and Darcy Fear, Huron Green Class.
The antique tractor award for most original restored went to Mike Boven for his John Deere 40 Row Crop and the award for most original un-restored went to Ken and Betty Glanville for their John Deere 8020 Diesel.
Angela Smith placed first in the novelty class, Winston Jibb placed second and Brian McGavin placed third.
This year’s Huron County Ploughing Match was a great success last week, and a lot of those thanks should go to the Shortreed family, the hosts of the match. The family was honoured Friday night at the match’s banquet, which was held at the Brussels, Morris and Grey Community Centre. From left: Queen of the Furrow Ursina Studhalter, Julie Shortreed, Matt Shortreed, Connor Shortreed, Val Shortreed, Brad Shortreed, Huron County Warden Joe Steffler and Huron County Plowmen’s Association President Brian McGavin. To see a full gallery of pictures from the event, click here. (Jim Brown photo)
Huron County Plowmen’s Association President Brian McGavin says this year’s Huron County Ploughing Match was everything he hoped it would be and more, despite concerns about weather early last week.
McGavin said he received a number of positive comments about the level of competition, the site and the hospitality that Huron County displayed and he’s so proud of his community and all of the people involved in making the match happen.
The attendance numbers were about what McGavin expected, he said, as were the number of competitive participants, but what surprised him was from how far some of the participants came.
“We had people come from Peterborough, from Owen Sound and then from the south,” McGavin said. “It was great to see.”
McGavin said that not only did he receive a lot of positive comments about this year’s match, but he also heard from a lot of people who are already looking forward to the 2017 International Plowing Match, which will be held in Walton.
McGavin says he was told on numerous occasions that if the Huron County match at the home of Val Shortreed and family and Matt Shortreed and family was any indication, the 2017 match is going to be one for the ages.
As for the Shortreeds, McGavin says he had high expectations for the family as hosts, but exceeded them.
“You couldn’t have asked for better hosts,” McGavin said. “If you needed anything, they would drop whatever they were doing to help.”
Last Updated on Thursday, 28 August 2014 11:44
Read more...
 
Aitken Places Sixth in Youth Olympics - Aug. 28 PDF Print E-mail
Written by Shawn Loughlin   
Wednesday, 27 August 2014 12:31
Londesborough-area track and field athlete Lexi Aitken placed sixth in the women’s 400-metre hurdles A Final on Monday at the 2014 Youth Olympics in Nanjing, China.
Aitken posted a time of 1:00.27 in the race, which was run on Monday night in China (Monday morning, local time). She was bested by Gezelle Magerman of South Africa, who won the gold medal with a time of 57.91; second place Michaela Peskova of Slovakia with a time of 58.26; third place Anne Sofie Fruerskov Kirkegaard of Denmark with a time of 58.60; Tereza Volkova of the Czech Republic in fourth place with a time of 59.76 and Michelle Mueller of Switzerland, who finished fifth with a time of 59.86.
The 16-year-old Aitken ran in the first qualifying heat for the event on Friday, posting a time of 1:00.41, placing third in her heat behind Peskova and Shenice Cohen of Jamaica. Her time was seventh-best in the qualifying heats, earning her a spot in the A Final.
For a full list of results from all events, visit www.nanjing2014.org
Check back with a future issue of The Citizen with an interview with Aitken upon her return to Canada.
Londesborough-area track and field athlete Lexi Aitken placed sixth in the women’s 400-metre hurdles A Final on Monday at the 2014 Youth Olympics in Nanjing, China.
Aitken posted a time of 1:00.27 in the race, which was run on Monday night in China (Monday morning, local time). She was bested by Gezelle Magerman of South Africa, who won the gold medal with a time of 57.91; second place Michaela Peskova of Slovakia with a time of 58.26; third place Anne Sofie Fruerskov Kirkegaard of Denmark with a time of 58.60; Tereza Volkova of the Czech Republic in fourth place with a time of 59.76 and Michelle Mueller of Switzerland, who finished fifth with a time of 59.86.
The 16-year-old Aitken ran in the first qualifying heat for the event on Friday, posting a time of 1:00.41, placing third in her heat behind Peskova and Shenice Cohen of Jamaica. Her time was seventh-best in the qualifying heats, earning her a spot in the A Final.
For a full list of results from all events, visit www.nanjing2014.org
Check back with a future issue of The Citizen with an interview with Aitken upon her return to Canada.
 
Area Natives Craft 'Turtle Power' documentary - Aug. 28 PDF Print E-mail
Written by Shawn Loughlin   
Wednesday, 27 August 2014 12:27
This Sunday Goderich’s Park Theatre is hosting a screening of a documentary created by local talent that has been released domestically and will soon be released abroad.
Turtle Power: The Definitive History of Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles will be shown at 1:30 p.m. at the theatre in Goderich on The Square on Sunday, Aug. 31 and will be followed by a question and answer session with the filmmakers Mark Hussey, Randall Lobb and Isaac Elliott-Fisher.
Hussey, who grew up in the belgrave area, and Lobb both live in Goderich while Elliott-Fisher, now of Paris, grew up in Clinton. The team has been working on the film for several years and found Paramount Pictures willing to distribute the movie alongside its summer blockbuster, a re-imagining of the documentary’s source-material Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles which has brought in $238,735,253 worldwide at the box office.
The documentary film started as an idea with Elliott-Fisher who, even before starting film school, had produced several short films and one documentary of his own on Toyota Land Cruisers.
“Before I went to film school, and throughout, I was collecting movie-related toys and items,” he said. “I focused on the [Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles] stuff because I loved it when I was a kid.”
Elliott-Fisher said that when he was young, around five-years-old, toys from the movie were a staple on his birthday.
After some initial research, Elliott-Fisher found himself sitting in front of a restaurant in Goderich with Lobb and Hussey and pitching the idea.
While Lobb was apprehensive at first, Hussey, no doubt channeling some of what Lobb called his ‘eternal optimism’, jumped on board immediately for the project.
The trio, along with help from friends and family, started pursuing leads and eventually got in touch with the original creators of the intellectual property, its current owners and its previous owners and, after a brief hiatus in 2009, found traction with Paramount Pictures as the company prepared the film that was released earlier this summer.
Lobb explained that the film received some very high ‘Quality Control [QC]’ reviews from Paramount Pictures and says that success came from the overlapping skillsets of not only the three filmmakers but also those around them.
“Mark has this amazing ability with technology,” he said. “He’s an autodidact, which means he is self-taught. He’s a long-time tech fan and a gadget guy so he’s interested in all technology.”
Hussey learned sound mixing, music and lighting from being part of local bands both with his family and with his friends and, from there, his expertise has grown.
Lobb said that interest came in handy with the creation because if there was anything Hussey wasn’t familiar with, he had a good base to start with.
The trio could also rely on help, whether it be simply crew to help set up for filming or more technical needs, through family like Lobb’s cousin Curt Lobb.
As for Elliott-Fisher, he said that coming from a small town and learning a lot before being formally educated helped a lot but it still didn’t prepare him for some of the realizations he ran into.
“We were the small town boys that went out and did something crazy,” he said. “That didn’t really sink in, though, until we were sitting in Brian Henson’s office. Here we were, in Jim Henson’s studio, just three guys from Huron County and we were able to look back and say you really can come from anywhere and do anything. All you need is to have a good idea and stick with it.”
Hussey said that he was glad that the film had received such high praise and that he is very much looking forward to future projects.
While Lobb couldn’t specifically say what projects they were looking at, he said the trio had found the groundwork necessary to study similar intellectual properties.
“There are many franchises that are like the [Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles],” he said. “Those are long-time intellectual properties that have new things happening with them and we certainly learned a way of approaching those properties and bringing a lot of value to them.”
Seats are now available to the public for the special screening. For those not lucky enough to make it, the documentary has been released domestically through Video on Demand, iTunes and on DVD at major retail outlets.
For more information, visit the documentary’s Facebook group at www.facebook.com/TurtlePowerMovie or visit turtlepower.eventbrite.com for tickets.
Three local filmmakers will be showing the fruits of their labour at Goderich’s Park Theatre this weekend when Turtle Power: The Definitive History of Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles has a special screening on Sunday. Isaac Elliott-Fisher, left, Randall Lobb, right, and Mark Hussey, second from left are all from Huron County. The trio is shown here with Peter Laird, second from right, one of the creators of the fictional turtles. (Richard Fitoussi photo)
This Sunday Goderich’s Park Theatre is hosting a screening of a documentary created by local talent that has been released domestically and will soon be released abroad.
Turtle Power: The Definitive History of Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles will be shown at 1:30 p.m. at the theatre in Goderich on The Square on Sunday, Aug. 31 and will be followed by a question and answer session with the filmmakers Mark Hussey, Randall Lobb and Isaac Elliott-Fisher.
Hussey, who grew up in the belgrave area, and Lobb both live in Goderich while Elliott-Fisher, now of Paris, grew up in Clinton. The team has been working on the film for several years and found Paramount Pictures willing to distribute the movie alongside its summer blockbuster, a re-imagining of the documentary’s source-material Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles which has brought in $238,735,253 worldwide at the box office.
The documentary film started as an idea with Elliott-Fisher who, even before starting film school, had produced several short films and one documentary of his own on Toyota Land Cruisers.
“Before I went to film school, and throughout, I was collecting movie-related toys and items,” he said. “I focused on the [Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles] stuff because I loved it when I was a kid.”
Elliott-Fisher said that when he was young, around five-years-old, toys from the movie were a staple on his birthday.
After some initial research, Elliott-Fisher found himself sitting in front of a restaurant in Goderich with Lobb and Hussey and pitching the idea.
While Lobb was apprehensive at first, Hussey, no doubt channeling some of what Lobb called his ‘eternal optimism’, jumped on board immediately for the project.
The trio, along with help from friends and family, started pursuing leads and eventually got in touch with the original creators of the intellectual property, its current owners and its previous owners and, after a brief hiatus in 2009, found traction with Paramount Pictures as the company prepared the film that was released earlier this summer.
Last Updated on Thursday, 28 August 2014 11:43
Read more...
 
Blyth Festival Artistic Director Looks Back on First Season - Aug. 28 PDF Print E-mail
Written by Shawn Loughlin   
Wednesday, 27 August 2014 12:16
With yet another season of the Blyth Festival coming to a close, Artistic Director Marion de Vries took time to sit down with The Citizen and look back on this new milestone in her theatre career.
With energy and enthusiasm that knows no bounds, de Vries put all of it into what was not only the 40th season of the Festival, but what for de Vries was her first full year working with the festival.
“I am thrilled with the season,” said de Vries. “I am just absolutely thrilled and excited about the quality of work on stage. We’ve had an absolutely amazing company this year of directors, designers, production crew and staff.”
The performance which really struck both a theatrical and emotional chord with her, as well as with many of the audience members, was St. Anne’s Reel, which de Vries directed.
She explained that even though the characters in the story were fictional, the backdrop was something that was really familiar to people living in the local community, which helped to connect the audience to those characters on an emotional level.
“It’s a really moving play, and there were some people who have even come out of it in tears,” de Vries said. “There was actually one gentleman who told the playwright [Gil Garratt] after the show that they had a child they hadn’t seen or talked to in many years, and they were going to call him that night.”
It is moments like that, de Vries says, which reveal the true purpose of live theatre, which is to motivate people into taking action in their life they otherwise wouldn’t have.
“The best theatre is transformative, making you see yourself and your relationships,” says de Vries. “If theatre can affect you in that way, it makes me the happiest.”
Another highlight performance for de Vries was Kitchen Radio, which she wrote, and one of three world premieres the Festival has produced this season.
In a previous interview with The Citizen, she had admitted that opening the season with her play, especially for her first season as artistic director, made her a little nervous, but the audience’s response to it washed all of those worries away.
“I’m just happy that so many people have loved my play,” de Vries said. “Kelli Fox, who directed it, really understood the play. That was a really creatively fulfilling project to do as a playwright.”
Kitchen Radio was a story that de Vries had spent many years honing and perfecting, which made its positive reception at the Festival all the more rewarding.
The one show that de Vries said would have been a box office hit, had some theatre goers not been put off by the war theme, was Billy Bishop Goes To War.
“People saw the word ‘war’ and thought it would be a sombre and depressing play, but it wasn’t,” de Vries said. “Although it didn’t do as well in the box office, it’s too bad, because people missed a really great show.”
She felt that former two-time Festival Artistic Director Janet Amos, who directed Billy Bishop Goes To War, really went for the truth, and was successful in bringing out a beautiful and unique production which, despite the low ticket sales, received high praise from those who did go to see it.
Reflecting on the season as a whole, from the perspective of both a director and a playwright, de Vries says that everything went very smoothly, and that she fulfilled her role in the show without any regrets.
“We all have thoughts of ‘oh, let’s do this’ or ‘we should have done that’, but you just can’t get everything done in the first year,” she said.
Personally, de Vries sees the arts as being essential for our development as human beings, and are as important as any other way of learning. She says this is especially true for the Young Company, which not only raises young actors and directors, but also helps to develop the skills they need for everyday life.
“Being involved in the Young Company, you learn basic skills like trust, communication, researching other people’s lives, and learning how to be comfortable taking risks,” she said.
With that in mind, de Vries was very excited to hear that the Blyth Centre for the Arts has been nominated once again for the Premier’s Award for Excellence in the Arts.
“We’re excited to be nominated again, because we get to go and be part of the celebration of the arts across Ontario,” de Vries said. “It’s a recognition of how important the arts are in the quality of life in our community and communities across Huron County.”
All in all, de Vries says it has been a great honour to work alongside the theatre company this season, and to be part of the festival celebrating 40 years of Canadian theatre.
“It is a huge accomplishment for the theatre and the community, and I was thankful to be a part of it,” de Vries says.
The ceremony for the Premier’s Award of Excellence in the Arts will take place on Sept. 16 at Roy Thomson Hall in Toronto.
With her first season now behind her, Marion de Vries, artistic director of the Blyth Festival reflects back on the highs and lows. (Shawn Loughlin photo)
With yet another season of the Blyth Festival coming to a close, Artistic Director Marion de Vries took time to sit down with The Citizen and look back on this new milestone in her theatre career.
With energy and enthusiasm that knows no bounds, de Vries put all of it into what was not only the 40th season of the Festival, but what for de Vries was her first full year working with the festival.
“I am thrilled with the season,” said de Vries. “I am just absolutely thrilled and excited about the quality of work on stage. We’ve had an absolutely amazing company this year of directors, designers, production crew and staff.”
The performance which really struck both a theatrical and emotional chord with her, as well as with many of the audience members, was St. Anne’s Reel, which de Vries directed.
She explained that even though the characters in the story were fictional, the backdrop was something that was really familiar to people living in the local community, which helped to connect the audience to those characters on an emotional level.
“It’s a really moving play, and there were some people who have even come out of it in tears,” de Vries said. “There was actually one gentleman who told the playwright [Gil Garratt] after the show that they had a child they hadn’t seen or talked to in many years, and they were going to call him that night.”
It is moments like that, de Vries says, which reveal the true purpose of live theatre, which is to motivate people into taking action in their life they otherwise wouldn’t have.
“The best theatre is transformative, making you see yourself and your relationships,” says de Vries. “If theatre can affect you in that way, it makes me the happiest.”
Another highlight performance for de Vries was Kitchen Radio, which she wrote, and one of three world premieres the Festival has produced this season.
Last Updated on Thursday, 28 August 2014 11:42
Read more...
 
Team Wawanosh Returns to Royal Agricultural Winter Fair - Aug. 28 PDF Print E-mail
Written by Shawn Loughlin   
Wednesday, 27 August 2014 12:08
Team Wawanosh, representing Region 5, will be heading to the Royal Agricultural Winter Fair on Nov. 8 for the 4-H Provincial Go For the Gold Competition. Region 5 includes the counties of Bruce, Grey, Huron and Perth. This year, Team Wawanosh consists of Loretta Higgins, Maisy Jefferson, Scott Jefferson and Connor Rogers; with Cathy Drennan as the lead coach.
In order for teams to participate at the provincial level, they must have competed and placed first or second at their local county level and then place first at the regional level.
For 33 years, Go for the Gold has been an integral part of many 4-H projects across the province. The competition presents the ultimate challenge to members by testing their skills and knowledge of 4-H, agriculture, life skills, food, nutrition and current events.
On July 9, the Huron County Go for the Gold competition was held in Clinton. Two teams, Hensall and Wawanosh placed first and second respectively. Both teams then competed in the regional competition, held in Walkerton on Aug. 13. In this Region 5 round there was a three-way tie for first place. A semi-final and final match were then held. Wawanosh won against Hanover in the semi-finals and then went on to beat Perth 1 in the final match.
Team Wawanosh will represent Region 5 in the 4-H Provincial Go for the Gold competition at the Royal Agricultural Winter Fair later this year. The team is, from left: Maisy Jefferson, Loretta Higgins, Connor Rogers, Scott Jefferson and coach Cathy Drennan. (Photo submitted)
Team Wawanosh, representing Region 5, will be heading to the Royal Agricultural Winter Fair on Nov. 8 for the 4-H Provincial Go For the Gold Competition. Region 5 includes the counties of Bruce, Grey, Huron and Perth. This year, Team Wawanosh consists of Loretta Higgins, Maisy Jefferson, Scott Jefferson and Connor Rogers; with Cathy Drennan as the lead coach.
In order for teams to participate at the provincial level, they must have competed and placed first or second at their local county level and then place first at the regional level.
For 33 years, Go for the Gold has been an integral part of many 4-H projects across the province. The competition presents the ultimate challenge to members by testing their skills and knowledge of 4-H, agriculture, life skills, food, nutrition and current events.
On July 9, the Huron County Go for the Gold competition was held in Clinton. Two teams, Hensall and Wawanosh placed first and second respectively. Both teams then competed in the regional competition, held in Walkerton on Aug. 13. In this Region 5 round there was a three-way tie for first place. A semi-final and final match were then held. Wawanosh won against Hanover in the semi-finals and then went on to beat Perth 1 in the final match.
Last Updated on Thursday, 28 August 2014 11:40
 
« StartPrev12NextEnd »

Page 1 of 2