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News - July 17 PDF Print E-mail
Written by Shawn Loughlin   
Wednesday, 16 July 2014 12:14
When added to the existing construction in the south of the village, above, further construction at the north end of Brussels, below, which also hinders the most travelled easterly route, visually locks the village’s downtown and primary residential areas off from the rest of the world. Currently the only way into Brussels that doesn’t include construction waits and weaving is Morris Road. Add to this the “shave and pave” operation, see page 7 for picture, ongoing in Blyth last week and travelling just about anywhere was a headache for motorists. (Denny Scott photos)
When added to the existing construction in the south of the village, above, further construction at the north end of Brussels, below, which also hinders the most travelled easterly route, visually locks the village’s downtown and primary residential areas off from the rest of the world. Currently the only way into Brussels that doesn’t include construction waits and weaving is Morris Road. Add to this the “shave and pave” operation, see page 7 for picture, ongoing in Blyth last week and travelling just about anywhere was a headache for motorists. (Denny Scott photos)
Last Updated on Wednesday, 16 July 2014 13:42
 
Writer Heralds Proposed G2G Trail - July 17 PDF Print E-mail
Written by Shawn Loughlin   
Wednesday, 16 July 2014 11:49
Travelling the 127-kilometre proposed Guelph-to-Goderich (G2G) Rail Trail was a tremendous experience says accomplished author Lynda Wilson, who plans to write a book about the journey.
Because portions of the trail have not been maintained for years and have become overgrown, the journey involved some “bushwhacking” and detours, but the experience is one that will stay with Wilson and her husband Doug for years to come.
Lynda and Doug first became aware of the trail proposal through a relationship with Walton’s Chris Lee. Lee and Doug first met through their work with RTO (Regional Tourism Organization) 4.
The journey began when a friend dropped them off in Guelph and Lynda and Doug began walking the trail. They had decided to stay in local hotels and bed and breakfasts along the way.
The pair had planned to travel a set distance every day, but because of “black holes” in local accommodation and restaurants, some days involved much more travel than others.
One such area was when the Wilsons wrapped up their day’s travels about six kilometres east of Monkton. Through correspondence with Lee, a roadside pick-up was organized by Graeme Craig, owner of the Walton Inn. Craig and the Wilsons met for the first time on the side of the road.
After bringing the couple to the Inn and providing accommodation for the night, Craig had breakfast with the Wilsons the next morning before dropping them right back where he picked them up the previous night.
Their next steps were then from Walton through to Blyth, where they landed right in the middle of the Canada Day long weekend.
In Blyth, the Wilsons connected with Anne Elliott and Les Cook of the Queens Bakery, where they would dine and stay (in the accommodations above the Bakery) for the next two days.
“It was the most amazing experience in Blyth,” Lynda said. “It was so wonderful.”
They then travelled from Blyth to Auburn, but camped out at the Auburn Grill while waiting for a ride back to Blyth to stay for the night, which came by way of Don and Sandy Bailey of Blyth.
The next day the Wilsons finished the journey, coming into Goderich on a lovely sunny day, Lynda says.
The entire experience, she says, was great, despite the fact that portions of the trail have, for obvious reasons, remained ungroomed.
“The path itself is spectacular, even the sections that were ungroomed,” Lynda said.
She said she particularly enjoyed the landscape along the way and travelling through Amish and Mennonite communities.
She said she could feel a real sense of community connection along the trail. Because the trail’s intended original purpose was to link travellers from community to community via train, she can easily see the G2G trail doing exactly the same thing.
As far as the writing process is concerned, Lynda said she brought along her iPad, planning to take notes and document observations every night, but after the first night, it was clear that soreness and exhaustion would greatly limit evening activities.
“After the first night, that’s when the pain set it,” Lynda said. “Travelling between 20 and 27 kilometres per day is definitely a shock to the feet.”
When she and Doug would stop and talk to locals or residents along the trail, or dine with people like Craig or Lee, Lynda would often record the conversations.
In the coming months, Lynda hopes to begin work on writing the book with the intention that it would be published by the end of the year.
Late last month, author Lynda Wilson and her husband Doug endeavoured to walk the entire proposed Guelph-to-Goderich (G2G) Rail Trail. They did so at the end of June and early July, covering between 20 and 27 kilometres per day, meeting plenty of locals along the way. Lynda hopes her book will be published by the end of the year. They can be seen here in Goderich at the end of the trail. (Photo submitted)
Travelling the 127-kilometre proposed Guelph-to-Goderich (G2G) Rail Trail was a tremendous experience says accomplished author Lynda Wilson, who plans to write a book about the journey.
Because portions of the trail have not been maintained for years and have become overgrown, the journey involved some “bushwhacking” and detours, but the experience is one that will stay with Wilson and her husband Doug for years to come.
Lynda and Doug first became aware of the trail proposal through a relationship with Walton’s Chris Lee. Lee and Doug first met through their work with RTO (Regional Tourism Organization) 4.
The journey began when a friend dropped them off in Guelph and Lynda and Doug began walking the trail. They had decided to stay in local hotels and bed and breakfasts along the way.
The pair had planned to travel a set distance every day, but because of “black holes” in local accommodation and restaurants, some days involved much more travel than others.
One such area was when the Wilsons wrapped up their day’s travels about six kilometres east of Monkton. Through correspondence with Lee, a roadside pick-up was organized by Graeme Craig, owner of the Walton Inn. Craig and the Wilsons met for the first time on the side of the road.
After bringing the couple to the Inn and providing accommodation for the night, Craig had breakfast with the Wilsons the next morning before dropping them right back where he picked them up the previous night.
Their next steps were then from Walton through to Blyth, where they landed right in the middle of the Canada Day long weekend.
In Blyth, the Wilsons connected with Anne Elliott and Les Cook of the Queens Bakery, where they would dine and stay (in the accommodations above the Bakery) for the next two days.
“It was the most amazing experience in Blyth,” Lynda said. “It was so wonderful.”
Last Updated on Wednesday, 16 July 2014 13:48
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Wind Turbines Dominate Central Huron Official Plan Meeting - July 17 PDF Print E-mail
Written by Shawn Loughlin   
Wednesday, 16 July 2014 10:51
Central Huron Council hosted the longest meeting in recent memory on July 7, opening the floor to comment on the five-year review of the municipality’s official plan.
The meeting ran until after 10:30 p.m., meaning that a motion had to be passed for the meeting to run past the 10 p.m. curfew.
Susanna Reid of the Huron County Planning Department presented the review and proposed changes to the plan, but it was one small clause, over which Central Huron Council has no authority, that resulted in hours’ worth of public comment: the section pertaining to the provincial government’s Green Energy Act.
Reid’s presentation said there should be no provisions in Central Huron’s official plan pertaining to renewable energy such as wind turbines or solar power, as any municipal- or Huron County-level planning authority on such matters has been stripped by the provincial government by the Act. She said that the Central Huron official plan would have to conform with the Huron County official plan and the Provincial Policy Statement, which both defer planning authority on renewable energy, as dictated by the Green Energy Act, to the province.
This statement, however, did not sit well with a number of wind turbine opponents in attendance that night, who all opted to voice their concerns to council.
Resident Fred Dutot said he felt the proposed official plan would be at odds with Central Huron’s declaration that the municipality is an “unwilling host” to industrial wind turbine projects.
In his mind, the official plan would be “allowing” wind turbines, which would be a direct contradiction to the unwilling host declaration, a motion that was passed unanimously by council at the time.
Dutot complained about Toronto politicians, saying that they were forcing wind turbines on rural Ontario; a decision that was easy to make when the turbines wouldn’t be visible from a 30-storey office building in the Ontario capital.
Bob Budd, another turbine opponent, was also critical of the official plan, wondering aloud whether the official plan should be tied to other official plans or whether it should be a vision of what council hopes the municipality to be in the future. If the latter was the case, he said, provisions governing wind turbines should be part of the Central Huron official plan.
Central Huron Against Turbines (CHAT) member Dave Hemingway said that the Central Huron official plan should represent what the people of Central Huron want, and not the interest of private corporations or the provincial government.
To that end, Hemingway said, the Green Energy Act shouldn’t even be mentioned in the Central Huron official plan.
Council then listened to a number of other residents who all voiced their opposition to industrial wind turbine projects.
While no action was taken in terms of the review at the July 7 meeting, Mayor Jim Ginn has said that he feels the five-year review of the official plan should be approved before the municipal election this fall.
Central Huron Council hosted the longest meeting in recent memory on July 7, opening the floor to comment on the five-year review of the municipality’s official plan.
The meeting ran until after 10:30 p.m., meaning that a motion had to be passed for the meeting to run past the 10 p.m. curfew.
Susanna Reid of the Huron County Planning Department presented the review and proposed changes to the plan, but it was one small clause, over which Central Huron Council has no authority, that resulted in hours’ worth of public comment: the section pertaining to the provincial government’s Green Energy Act.
Reid’s presentation said there should be no provisions in Central Huron’s official plan pertaining to renewable energy such as wind turbines or solar power, as any municipal- or Huron County-level planning authority on such matters has been stripped by the provincial government by the Act. She said that the Central Huron official plan would have to conform with the Huron County official plan and the Provincial Policy Statement, which both defer planning authority on renewable energy, as dictated by the Green Energy Act, to the province.
This statement, however, did not sit well with a number of wind turbine opponents in attendance that night, who all opted to voice their concerns to council.
Resident Fred Dutot said he felt the proposed official plan would be at odds with Central Huron’s declaration that the municipality is an “unwilling host” to industrial wind turbine projects.
In his mind, the official plan would be “allowing” wind turbines, which would be a direct contradiction to the unwilling host declaration, a motion that was passed unanimously by council at the time.
Dutot complained about Toronto politicians, saying that they were forcing wind turbines on rural Ontario; a decision that was easy to make when the turbines wouldn’t be visible from a 30-storey office building in the Ontario capital.
Bob Budd, another turbine opponent, was also critical of the official plan, wondering aloud whether the official plan should be tied to other official plans or whether it should be a vision of what council hopes the municipality to be in the future. If the latter was the case, he said, provisions governing wind turbines should be part of the Central Huron official plan.
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"Who Heals You" Opens Friday at Blyth Festival Art Gallery - July 17 PDF Print E-mail
Written by Shawn Loughlin   
Wednesday, 16 July 2014 10:26
The Blyth Festival Art Gallery features local artist Kelly Stevenson in its fourth exhibition of the season. The Blyth resident moved to town as a teenager 10 years ago. Since graduating from the Ontario College of Art and Design in 2012, she has participated in a number of shows in Toronto, Stratford and Huron County, winning awards for her work.
The art pieces in “Who Heals You” use a variety of media and are intended to hold a mirror up to ourselves as a society and ask us to examine our consumerism.
The imagery of Kelly’s paintings originates from a combination of broken or damaged objects, hardware and discarded technology. Working on paper or surfaces that have lost their original purpose, she strives to open a dialogue with the viewer. Embracing a naïve style, the exhibition consists of works that explore relationships among religion, technology, violence, hope and human connections. Through the use of a parallel universe, the works take inspiration from the society we live in and examine the darkness and light that’s in all of us.
She describes the theme in this way, “In a time increasingly ruled by technology and under the constant bombardment of violent images, our western society has continued down a path leading to the dehumanization of others and those closest to us.”
Kelly attempts to understand the world we live in, and the connections between humans in our technology-filled times. It’s through her paintings that the viewers will have an opportunity to question our society and ourselves.
“Who Heals You”, an exhibition by Kelly Stevenson, is presented by the Blyth Festival Art Gallery and sponsored by Lynda and Duncan McGregor. It can be viewed in the Bainton Gallery (next to the box office) in the Blyth Memorial Hall, July 18 - Aug. 10, Tuesdays to Saturdays from 10 a.m. to 9 p.m.
The public is invited to meet the artist at the opening reception on Friday, July 18 at 6 p.m.
Blyth artist Kelly Stevenson is the subject of the Blyth Festival Art Gallery’s newest exhibition, which uses a variety of media, as well as broken or damaged objects, hardware and discarded technology. “Who Heals You” opens at the Gallery this Friday night with a gala opening at 6 p.m. (Photo submitted)
The Blyth Festival Art Gallery features local artist Kelly Stevenson in its fourth exhibition of the season. The Blyth resident moved to town as a teenager 10 years ago. Since graduating from the Ontario College of Art and Design in 2012, she has participated in a number of shows in Toronto, Stratford and Huron County, winning awards for her work.
The art pieces in “Who Heals You” use a variety of media and are intended to hold a mirror up to ourselves as a society and ask us to examine our consumerism.
The imagery of Kelly’s paintings originates from a combination of broken or damaged objects, hardware and discarded technology. Working on paper or surfaces that have lost their original purpose, she strives to open a dialogue with the viewer. Embracing a naïve style, the exhibition consists of works that explore relationships among religion, technology, violence, hope and human connections. Through the use of a parallel universe, the works take inspiration from the society we live in and examine the darkness and light that’s in all of us.
She describes the theme in this way, “In a time increasingly ruled by technology and under the constant bombardment of violent images, our western society has continued down a path leading to the dehumanization of others and those closest to us.”
Kelly attempts to understand the world we live in, and the connections between humans in our technology-filled times. It’s through her paintings that the viewers will have an opportunity to question our society and ourselves.
“Who Heals You”, an exhibition by Kelly Stevenson, is presented by the Blyth Festival Art Gallery and sponsored by Lynda and Duncan McGregor. It can be viewed in the Bainton Gallery (next to the box office) in the Blyth Memorial Hall, July 18 - Aug. 10, Tuesdays to Saturdays from 10 a.m. to 9 p.m.
The public is invited to meet the artist at the opening reception on Friday, July 18 at 6 p.m.
Last Updated on Wednesday, 16 July 2014 13:52
 
Blyth Streetfest Coming Next Weekend - July 17 PDF Print E-mail
Written by Shawn Loughlin   
Wednesday, 16 July 2014 10:10
With just a week and two days to go until the second annual Streetfest in Blyth things are looking great according to organizer Lorna Fraser.
Starting with a silent auction, which opens at Sharon’s Cars in Miniature on July 21 and runs until the drawing on July 26, the event is chock full of fun.
Entertainment will be hosted on the main stage again at the corner of Dinsley and Queen Streets. Fraser said, in an e-mail to The Citizen, that the lineup for musical entertainment had yet to be confirmed however she promises an exciting afternoon.
Vendors will be showcasing everything from health supplements to canoes and main street merchants will have the opportunity to make use of their sidewalks and put some of their own goods on display.
Food will be available at local restaurants, of course, but the selection will be supplemented by the Lions Club making its famous hot dogs and hamburgers and others.
“A vendor from last year that proved to be a big hit, Let the Flames Begin will also be back with its meats and treats,” Fraser said.
The Kiss the Pig competition will also be returning. This year Township of North Huron Roads Foreman for Blyth Rob Kolkman, his predecessor Bill Bromley and The Citizen reporter Denny Scott are participating.
“[They] will be putting their lips on the line, or should I say pig,” Fraser said. “Voting is taking place in various businesses and will continue until kissing time at 4:30 p.m. on July 26.”
The contestant who raises the most money will kiss the “north” end of the pig while the one who earns the least will kiss the other end. The person who raises the second-most could really be considered the winner as they will get to carry the pig to the stage and hold it while the other two pucker up.
Funds raised through the Kiss the Pig competition and any other avenues throughout the event will go towards streetscape projects for the Blyth Business Improvement Area including floral decorations, banners and Christmas lighting.
With just a week and two days to go until the second annual Streetfest in Blyth things are looking great according to organizer Lorna Fraser.
Starting with a silent auction, which opens at Sharon’s Cars in Miniature on July 21 and runs until the drawing on July 26, the event is chock full of fun.
Entertainment will be hosted on the main stage again at the corner of Dinsley and Queen Streets. Fraser said, in an e-mail to The Citizen, that the lineup for musical entertainment had yet to be confirmed however she promises an exciting afternoon.
Vendors will be showcasing everything from health supplements to canoes and main street merchants will have the opportunity to make use of their sidewalks and put some of their own goods on display.
Food will be available at local restaurants, of course, but the selection will be supplemented by the Lions Club making its famous hot dogs and hamburgers and others.
“A vendor from last year that proved to be a big hit, Let the Flames Begin will also be back with its meats and treats,” Fraser said.
The Kiss the Pig competition will also be returning. This year Township of North Huron Roads Foreman for Blyth Rob Kolkman, his predecessor Bill Bromley and The Citizen reporter Denny Scott are participating.
“[They] will be putting their lips on the line, or should I say pig,” Fraser said. “Voting is taking place in various businesses and will continue until kissing time at 4:30 p.m. on July 26.”
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Blyth Artist To Headline Blyth Festival Art Gallery - July 10 PDF Print E-mail
Written by Shawn Loughlin   
Wednesday, 09 July 2014 13:41
Kelly Stevenson, after graduating from the Ontario College of Arts and Design (OCAD), returned home to Blyth to work on her art and the lessons of that time will be on display soon at the Blyth Centre for the Arts.
Stevenson put forward a proposal for the Blyth Festival Art Gallery’s 2014 season of shows at the Bainton Gallery and, much to her surprise, she was chosen to have her first professional show hosted at the site. The show, which is called “Who Heals You,” will be on display from July 18 to August 10.
“I figured my proposal wouldn’t be chosen but it could get me in the practice of writing proposals at least,” she said. “It was a nice surprise when I found out I had been chosen. I know that what I do is not typical of the gallery space. It’s vastly different from its typical fare.”
Stevenson, who graduated from Central Huron Secondary School prior to attending OCAD, has had some exposure through the community art shows hosted at the gallery, but this will be the first time she has put together an entire show.
While some may think a gallery show is simply showing pieces that have already been created, Stevenson said that isn’t always true. In this case, she presented an idea and, after it was approved, she set to work making every piece for the show.
When asked, she said it was hard to explain her style and could only say it fits her belief system.
“I haven’t come across a word in any art text that describes my style,” she said. “It’s not surreal, but it’s not realistic either. It’s somewhere in between and relies heavily on symbolism.”
At school, she said for every class she had to work in a different style and in all those experiences she never found something that really encapsulated her work.
She said her work usually focuses on social or political ideas. This particular show, however, will focus on religion.
“It should be very interesting to see how people react to it,” she said.
She said that, as a person, she subscribes to the idea of humanism, a fluid idea that doesn’t always have a standing definition.
“I think that we need to focus on humans as a whole,” she said. “We separate ourselves and people are treated as others as a way of defining them and ourselves.”
To show that, Stevenson said she created figures that will play prominently in the show that have no identifying characteristics.
“There is no gender, no race, no age and no facial features so you just see them as people and not as a member of some group,” she said.
Stevenson said the perfect example of why humanism is the path she chooses is westernized media.
“We look at someone from an eastern nation and see them as a terrorist,” she said. “Meanwhile, people in the east see North American people as terrorists. We need to get past those constructs.
“That’s my main message is that people shouldn’t separate based on age, race, religion, gender or appearance. We’re all humans and that’s all that should be taken into account.”
Stevenson said being raised by parents who encouraged her to question everything and then question why she was questioning things led to her belief system.
“We were taught that everything can and should be evaluated and you can’t operate in absolutes,” she said. “The world just doesn’t operate that way.”
Being granted the show was a great moment for Stevenson because she felt it validated her decision to continue pursuing art as a career, something many of her peers from OCAD had given up on.
“There aren’t many people in my graduating class that are still focusing on art,” she said. “They went on to do other things but I wanted to stick with it.”
She said the show will help her continue to generate a body of work and “get her feet wet” in the arts world.
Stevenson plans on going back to school in the next three to five years to get a Master’s Degree in fine arts and hopefully use to that become a university professor. She will, however, continue to work on her art.
“No matter what I do I hope to have a consistent studio practice,” she said.
Stevenson said getting to a place where she can study will be because of three things, her desire to continue, her experiences like the upcoming show and the support she received when she was younger.
While her parents and family played a huge part in her pursuing her career, she also said her art teachers at Central Huron Secondary School really helped her pursue her dream.
“Miss Brown and Mrs. Gillam were my art teachers and they were fantastic,” she said. “They were amazing ladies.”
Artist Kelly Stevenson is very happy to have her first gallery opening at the Blyth Festival Art Gallery on July 17. Stevenson, shown above, doesn’t like working with a vertical canvas, far preferring it to be laid out on a table so she can really get into the work. Her show, “Who Heals You”, runs July 18 to Aug. 10 and features paper and found object productions. (Denny Scott photo)
Kelly Stevenson, after graduating from the Ontario College of Arts and Design (OCAD), returned home to Blyth to work on her art and the lessons of that time will be on display soon at the Blyth Centre for the Arts.
Stevenson put forward a proposal for the Blyth Festival Art Gallery’s 2014 season of shows at the Bainton Gallery and, much to her surprise, she was chosen to have her first professional show hosted at the site. The show, which is called “Who Heals You,” will be on display from July 18 to August 10.
“I figured my proposal wouldn’t be chosen but it could get me in the practice of writing proposals at least,” she said. “It was a nice surprise when I found out I had been chosen. I know that what I do is not typical of the gallery space. It’s vastly different from its typical fare.”
Stevenson, who graduated from Central Huron Secondary School prior to attending OCAD, has had some exposure through the community art shows hosted at the gallery, but this will be the first time she has put together an entire show.
While some may think a gallery show is simply showing pieces that have already been created, Stevenson said that isn’t always true. In this case, she presented an idea and, after it was approved, she set to work making every piece for the show.
When asked, she said it was hard to explain her style and could only say it fits her belief system.
“I haven’t come across a word in any art text that describes my style,” she said. “It’s not surreal, but it’s not realistic either. It’s somewhere in between and relies heavily on symbolism.”
At school, she said for every class she had to work in a different style and in all those experiences she never found something that really encapsulated her work.
She said her work usually focuses on social or political ideas. This particular show, however, will focus on religion.
“It should be very interesting to see how people react to it,” she said.
Last Updated on Thursday, 10 July 2014 11:01
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